THE FESTIVAL SERIES: LUMIERE FESTIVAL

This is my first article of a series, which have as the main purpose to introduce (or give you even more info) about any kind of festival, mainly in the UK but not exclusively. My goal is to host as many festivals as possible and also ensure that people with different taste and back-rounds, can find something interesting here. And first on our list would be the LUMIERE FESTIVAL.

Lumiere or differently London’s festival of light is a free festival that takes place for four days in our city. With more than 50 installations of projections, neons, interactive pieces and illuminated sculptures, Lumiere will make you see many buildings around London with a different perspective.

It was established in 2016. Following its great success and the millions of people who visited the festival, it’s time for the sequel. This time it’s even bigger, brighter and with even more artists participating.

 

One of the things that I really liked about this festival is that it is organised in a way that creates a “treasure hunt” experience. As the exhibits are spread all over the city, the participant will be touring so many areas, from the main Oxford Circus junction to small alleyways in Fitzrovia and all the way to King’s cross. My advice for someone who wants to attend is to check the weather and choose the warmest day as if it rains, it will make the whole experience a bit difficult, as the majority of the installations are outdoors.

So let’s get started! First, it’d be good to download the festival’s map (https://www.visitlondon.com/lumiere/programme/map#98d65uhWCQS8DBLC.97). This map will give you information, not only about the location but by tapping on one of the indicated spots you could see a pic of the installation, the artist and a small description. This will allow you to create your own personalised journey, based on what you’d like to see and the areas you’d prefer to explore.

In my case, my trip started from Picadilly circus and the great  Voyage by Camille Gross and Leslie Epsztein. This work has a station clock at its centre, which revolves around days and years, hours and minutes. As the hands of the clock swing around, they mark our changing world through the Belle Epoque and the Industrial Revolution, to the present day.

 

Second on my list Harmonic Portal by Chris Plant. In this artwork, Plant seeks to put together the pieces of our fragmented world. The soundtrack perfectly accompanies the shades of green, blue and red, as they gradually succeed one another. 

Just down the road, in Saint James Churchyard, you could find Tracey Emin’s artwork that goes by the name Be Faithful to Your Dreams. It ‘s the piece, with its simplicity in combination with the blue neon colour and the meaning behind the words that just rocked my world. Be Faithful to your dreams… What an important thing to remember, but still so easy to forget…

Making my way to King’s Cross, I had to go through Fitzrovia. There, in a small alleyway, following the sound of the water, I came across Droplets by Ulf Pedersen (http://ulfpedersen.com/). This is an installation made up of twelve animated water droplets, each toned to a different note. Additionally, the blue lights that were covering the trees, were successfully given a mystic feeling to the scene.

After a lot (BUT A LOT!!!!) of walking, we were finally at King’s Cross. I will try to keep it simple by giving you my two favourites, even though it is easy to get carried away considering the many installations and inspiring artworks around the area.

Waterlicht by Daan Roosegaarde (https://www.studioroosegaarde.net/projects): Dach artist Daan Roosegaarde, through this work, tries to highlight the impact that global warming will have in our lives if immediate action is not be taken. A virtual flood of water successfully represents the danger of the increasing water levels.

Aether by Architecture Social Club (https://www.aether.live/): an emotive and powerful light and sound installation. You will be amazed, as its glittering mass grows, rolls and splinters in reaction to the soundscape created by music producer Max Cooper. This fascinating artwork connects form, colour and music to our emotions, creating an interactive sensory experience.

P.S Remember to dress as comfy and warm as possible.

Until next time x

 

 

 

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